Tapering steroids in dogs

A very loose rule of thumb: If there is gradual or complete improvement within 72 hours, it is likely idiopathic vestibular disease and additional diagnostic testing is not necessary. If there is no improvement or there is a progression of signs, it is likely something much more serious, such as a tumor, and an MRI would be recommended to reach a definitive diagnosis. With idiopathic vestibular disease, marked improvement is usually evident in this time frame, with the pet returning to normal in 7 to 14 days (although in some dogs, a head tilt will still persist).

One drawback to Brennan’s study is that, unlike Kouri’s, there was evidence of attempted deception.  Several people had to be excluded from the non-users’ group because they were either definitely on steroids (they failed the urine test), or probably on steroids (in the researchers’ words, they had “implausibly high muscularity and low body fat despite denial of AAS use”).  However, even if a couple of users slipped in, they probably didn’t skew the data too much.  The sample size for nonusers was big enough (131 people) that a few bad apples wouldn’t spoil the whole bunch, and the researchers were excluding suspiciously jacked people anyways, so if a few users did slip in, they apparently weren’t swole enough to raise any red flags.

My dog has a skin problem including red dots, a black scaly-like bald patch under her armpit and an oily sweat-like feel on her skin.


She is a 4-year-old Shih Tzu is allergic to dustmite and pollen and is currently under immunotherapy. My vet put her a low dosage of Prenisolone (quarter tablet every alternate day) which I try not to give to her.

RED DOTS

Once every half an year or so, she has an outbreak of such red small pimple like growth usually on her armpit or bottom. I took her to the vet one month ago as I was unable to control the spread and she was scratching quite badly. However, this round, even after a round of antibotics, the red dots did not clear.

These red dots are not apparent all the time. After an oatmeal bath or a wipe with baking soda solution, the red dots are less obvious and she is more relax and comfortable. But once she start scratching, they swell and spread. She has been scratching, resulting in hair loss on her side.

I tried to change her diet two weeks ago to eliminate the possibility of food allergy, from homecooked chicken, oat, brown rice, egg, carrot and celery which she has been taking for the last half a year or so, to homecooked fish and potato. But the red dots doesnt seem to clear.

BLACK SCALY LIKE AREA UNDER HER ARMPIT

Due to her excessive scratching, her hair around the armpit area, on her feet and her underside has been relatively thin. The hair on her feet, side and even around her eyes do grow back (still thin though) but there is this area under her armpit that has black pigmentation forming cell like shape that doesnt grow much hair. I do not know whether it is because she still does scratch the area or are the skin permanently damaged. How can I speed up the growth of her hair after her outbreak is solved?

OILY (SWEAT-LIKE) FEEL ON SKIN

In addition to the above, the area under the armpit also produce excessive oil. I live in Singapore where is is relatively humid and hot whole year round. It feels like she sweat a lot under her armpit and this made her smell. She smells one day after bathing her. I occasionally bathe her with vet recommended shampoo with Chlorhexidine gluconate and Miconazole nitrate. Is her skin considered oily or dry? Should I bathe her with Oatmeal Shampoo for dry skin? Would Neem shampoo for pets work?

Why is she producing excessive oil and how can I resolve this?

Please do help as there is no holistic vet in Singapore and I really do not want to put my Shih Tzu on lots of medication.

My dog’s story- adopted him from the local animal shelter and within months he becomes an allergy dog. Spent thousands and countless vet visits before he went to a dermatologist. Atopica was the first treatment option and he developed two different tumors on it. Finally got him a chronic yeast infection, with maybe four flare ups a year with the weekly allergy shot. Moved him from NC to WA and he flared up so badly – paws swollen and ulcerated, bowel movements of only blood, we made the decision to put him down. The vet asked us to try one more thing – Apoquel. He has only been on it for five days but it is a miracle drug. I have read the potential side effects and have decided even if he has a shorter life due to his body not fighting off cancer cells, it is worth it. Atopica worried me more since it was originally intended for humans.

Cyclosporine: Cyclosporine can be used to control atopic dermatitis in dogs and allergic dermatitis (including atopy) in cats. The medication is given once a day for 4 weeks (4 to 6 weeks in cats, based on response). After that, the dose can be tapered to every other day or twice weekly, as needed to maintain effectiveness. Researchers estimate that over 70% of dogs and cats respond to this treatment; however, cyclosporine can be costly, and its side effects may include stomach upset and diarrhea. Ask your veterinarian if cyclosporine may be a good choice for your pet.

Tapering steroids in dogs

tapering steroids in dogs

My dog’s story- adopted him from the local animal shelter and within months he becomes an allergy dog. Spent thousands and countless vet visits before he went to a dermatologist. Atopica was the first treatment option and he developed two different tumors on it. Finally got him a chronic yeast infection, with maybe four flare ups a year with the weekly allergy shot. Moved him from NC to WA and he flared up so badly – paws swollen and ulcerated, bowel movements of only blood, we made the decision to put him down. The vet asked us to try one more thing – Apoquel. He has only been on it for five days but it is a miracle drug. I have read the potential side effects and have decided even if he has a shorter life due to his body not fighting off cancer cells, it is worth it. Atopica worried me more since it was originally intended for humans.

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